Current Connecticut Mortgage Rates Update May 15, 2012 11:25:46 AM EDT

Written by Geof McLaughlin

Topics: Connecticut Mortgage Rate Trends

Mortgage Commentary for Current Connecticut Mortgage Rates

Tuesday’s bond market has opened down slightly following a positive opening in stocks and no significant surprises in this morning’s major economic data. The stock markets are showing moderate gains with the Dow up 36 points and the Nasdaq up 17 points. The bond market is currently down 4/32, but I don’t believe we will see much of a change in current Connecticut mortgage rates.

Connecticut mortgage rates

The Commerce Department reported early this morning that April’s Retail Sales rose 0.1% when analysts were expecting a 0.2% increase. The reading that excludes more volatile auto sales also rose 0.1% compared to forecasts of 0.2%. Technically, the data is slightly favorable for bonds and Connecticut mortgage rates because it consumers spent less than expected last month. However, the variance wasn’t enough to raise much concern in the stock markets or optimism in the bond market.

April’s Consumer Price Index (CPI) was posted early this morning also, but by the Labor Department. They announced that the overall reading did not change from March’s level and that the core reading rose 0.2%. Both readings pegged forecasts, indicating that inflationary pressures remained near expectations last month. That makes the data neutral for bond trading and Connecticut mortgage pricing.

Tomorrow has three of this week’s reports scheduled, starting with April’s Housing Starts at 8:30 AM ET. This data measures housing sector strength and mortgage credit demand by tracking newly issued permits and actual starts of new home construction. It is expected to show an increase in new starts from March’s readings. Since this report is not considered to be of high importance to the bond market, it likely will have little impact on Connecticut mortgage rates unless it varies greatly from forecasts.

The second report of the day is April’s Industrial Production at 9:15 AM ET. It measures manufacturing sector strength by tracking output at U.S. factories, mines and utilities. It is expected to show a 0.5% increase in production, indicating that manufacturing activity is growing. A smaller than expected increase in output would be good news for the bond market and Connecticut mortgage pricing because it would indicate that the manufacturing sector is not as strong as thought. This report is just a bit more important to the markets as the earlier housing report, so they both will likely need to show unexpected strength or weakness for them to cause movement in Connecticut mortgage rates.

Tomorrow’s third release is the minutes of the last FOMC meeting. Market participants will be looking for how Fed members voted during the last meeting and any comments about inflation concerns in the economy and economic growth. The goal is to form opinions about the Fed being able to wait until late 2014 to make a move to either boost economic activity or slow growth to ease inflation concerns. Since the minutes will be released at 2:00 PM ET, if there is a market reaction to them it will be evident during afternoon trading tomorrow.

Connecticut mortgage rates

Rate Lock Advice for Current Connecticut Mortgage Rates

If I were considering purchasing or refinancing a home and predicting likely Connecticut mortgage rates, I would…

Lock if my closing was taking place within 7 days…
Lock if my closing was taking place between 8 and 20 days…
Float if my closing was taking place between 21 and 60 days…
Float if my closing was taking place over 60 days from now….

This is only a general opinion of what I would do if I were considering whether to lock or float current Connecticut mortgage rates based on the current mortgage market. Your individual situation may be different. Contact me if you would like advice for your particular circumstances.

Copyright : Mortgage Commentary

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